Why do games suck these days??? I miss the days of cheat codes and websites like GameWinners.com!

Discussion in 'Forum-Only Games' started by Mike Romano, Jun 30, 2017.

  1. Mike Romano

    Mike Romano New Member

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    I have almost every console since Atari. I grew up in the 80's, in my opinion, the greatest gaming time EVER! Now it's all about MMO's and/or Slot games on mobile. I would give almost anything to go back to those times! Everyone is obsessed with Online, Stategy or match 3 games. What happened to a really good 3rd person SINGLE player campaign? Like Metal Gear Solid 3! Those were the days. Kinda when cheats started to phase out, but... I especially don't like the way DLC is setup. DLC should be EXTRA stages/levels, more characters and the like. Not to buy points or whatever to open a chest and MAYBE u get something u wanted. Is it me??? I just loved codes & cheats AND the games for those codes. Even the master at codes, GTA, has dramatically decreased from what they had in GTA 3 & Vice City. GameWinners.com was the bomb diggity! Them and GameFaqs were the only two I used. Idk? Anyone else feel the same or am I just living in the past?
     
  2. Jawneh

    Jawneh ² ∞ & → Premium Member

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    Those games mostly work for us old farts who grew up with those games and thought they were the shit. Times be changing and the newer generations enjoy different kinds of games.

    We do get awesome single player games still though. Wolfenstein: New Order is awesome. We just got the new Doom which is fabulous. And if I recall in E3 they announced a new Wolfenstein game, as well as a sequal to Shadow of Mordor. These games are there for us.

    DLC are here to stay. Companies *coughEAcough* just got stupid with them and are offering somewhat watered down base games with a fuck load of DLC down the line to milk more monies from players. Can't help it. As long as people keep buying those DLCs they wont change their ways. Simple as that. Dont get me wrong, I'd love proper DLC that are the size of the base game itself, with the base game being awesome to begin with.

    Nothing wrong with a good MMO though. I can't agree with most of the stupid P2W "free-to-start" MMOs, but if you look at WoW or Final Fantasy XIV you see some great stuff.
     
  3. Fool's Requiem

    Fool's Requiem Is that a pro Genji?! Premium Member

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    We're all getting old. I miss the days of cheat codes, now it only seems the GTA series has them.
     
  4. Jon

    Jon Official Thread Killer Premium Member

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    I'm actually surprised at the dramatic shift. Honestly, the kowtowing to the new generation of gamers is far too dramatic. Most of the gaming generation's hey day still play, and we're in our late 20s to mid 30s. We still long for the games of our youth like the original Call of Duty and ATB-style Final Fantasy. And now we get things like Battlefield and the crap that Final Fantasy has turned into.

    My point, I guess, is that we are still a very large contingent of their target audience, or we should be. But everything is moving towards a very different audience at this point, and it's the old school games that still sell. It's almost as if logic is slapping them right in the face and they don't know how to react to it. Think of the best games of the last few years like Witcher 3, Dark Souls, Mass Effect, Uncharted, GTA, Persona, Portal...

    These are games that are long, primarily single-player, story-driven RPGs that incorporate a lot old school methods in their games. They are incredibly well-received and popular. Remember CoD in its glory days? There was no multiplayer. I like CoD multiplayer on some level myself, but it was right around Modern Warfare when it became more about the multiplayer and less about the amazing single player campaign that dominated the original three games.

    I'm with you that I miss those days. The evidence is there that supports those games are still money, but multiplayer games and the style now breeds microtransactions, pay-to-win and sponsorship... that means not only do customers shell out $60 for the game, but pay $100s after to try and one-up the competition. It's NEVER going away as a result.

    Personally, I'll pay $30-40 for DLC content to keep a game relevant longer, even if it's content that should have come with the release copy but was cut for time constraints (like Mass Effect 3's From Ashes DLC, as an example off hand). I'll also pay, occasionally for aesthetic DLC. I won't pay microtransactions or pay-to-win crap because I play multiplayer components and the like for entertainment, not epeen stroking.
     
  5. Crazy Jamie

    Crazy Jamie First recipient of the Amaloo Award Super Moderator Premium Member

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    Realistically the biggest change is business models, and that happens in every industry as technology advances, methods develop, and end users change in terms of taste etc. The shift to online happened because, well, everything has shifted online. We always did have expansions, and DLC is an evolution of that. But again media and products in many industries are consumed in a different way now, and there is a larger element of choice. Want to watch a new tv show? You can just watch it when it is on television. Or watch it on catch up. Or buy it. You've always been able to buy it. But now you can buy it on DVD, or subscribe to Netflix etc to watch it, or just buy an individual episode through those services.

    DLC is an extension of the same principles, as are micro transactions. Of course there is issues with how 'morally' companies are acting in that respect, but those issues have always existed in some form or another as well.

    Do I yearn for the 'good old days'. In some respects. Things were simpler, and there genuinely something to be said for that. Then again, a lot of the reason why I'm not as involved in games now as I was back then is more to do with me than the games. I've grown up. I just don't have the time anymore. I've still had some phenomenal gaming experiences in recent years, they're just less frequent (for example, Shadow of Modor on PS4 was and is fantastic). If I was a teenager now, there's no reason to think that I would be involved in Overwatch or similar in the same way that I was involved in Unreal Tournament or Team Fortress Classic. When all is said and done, I struggle to say the hobby is worse than it was before. It's evolved and more people are involved with it than ever before. Objectively I think it has to be concluded that both of those are good things.
     
  6. dimmerwit

    dimmerwit Tremendously High Energy Member Premium Member

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    Whilst I enjoy going back and playing old games from time to time, in general they simply don't compare to the most modern titles in looks (obviously), gameplay and features. Oblivion was a wonderful achievement in 2006, but the Witcher 3 is comfortably the better game in every respect. Team Fortress 2 was an amazing online experience but Overwatch takes it to the next level with even more style. GTA V is a mile ahead of San Andreas in every regard to such a degree that it's scarcely believable that they are only 9 years apart. Hitman: Blood Money was great, but Hitman 2016 is bigger, more open and had some incredible social features, and so on and so forth. I could go on, but I think the point is made.

    DLC has come about because technology made it feasable. If the NES, SNES or 64/PS1 era consoles supported microtransactions then developers would have jumped aboard, because as others have said it's not much different to what happens in other forms of media, or even other industries. There's no doubt that some games have been spoiled by over-priced or underbaked stuff, or from selling content that obviously should have been in the main game. But when DLC is done in the right way, as in Rainbow 6 Siege or the Witcher 3 to use two recent examples, it can really enhance the experience and give you more hours of quality content with games/characters/locations you've grown to be familiar with. We've also seen more and more games move towards releasing free content supported by cosmetic microtransactions, which frankly would be my favourite business model. I do think even the most guilty companies are (slowly) coming around to the fact that pushing additional content on a $60 purchase leaves a sour taste and that paid content must be done well.

    That said, whilst the ability to make online transactions has given us DLC it has also meant the rise of services like Steam, Humble, GOG and the expansions of Xbox Live and PSN, allowing a whole new wave of creative games to release to a wide audience, find visibility and succeed. If you went back in time 10 years ago, then everyone was complaining that all the big games outside of sports games were either FPS or action games with the same cookie-cutter features. I mean, 2007 was a great year for games despite that, but we have a lot more variety now and I'm thankful for it.

    I have nostalgia pangs like the next guy, especially as I've been playing the Crash trilogy (and would like a SNES mini) but I do prefer modern games and I think in 10 or 20 years time I will be writing the same thing. And whilst I do miss cheat codes and memorising the best ones, if losing them is the price of progress then so be it!
     
  7. Fool's Requiem

    Fool's Requiem Is that a pro Genji?! Premium Member

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    Maybe it's just me, but I'm okay with the direction the new FF game is taking the series. It's finally reached the point to where the graphics are as good as the cutscenes, and they've done away with the awful turn-based combat of old. I like old games, but I despise turn-based combat. My distaste for it has been well stated often on this very forum over the last 14 or so years. The combat lacks any sort of logic, and it takes the actions out of your hands, which is the exact opposite to why I play video games in the first place.

    Also, an open world FF just makes sense... so much sense, they should have started doing it over a decade ago.
     
  8. Crazy Jamie

    Crazy Jamie First recipient of the Amaloo Award Super Moderator Premium Member

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    Have you got one on pre order? I have managed to pre order more than one simply because I expect to be let down on at least one of them. If you haven't managed to pre order one yet and do want one, I'll send you one of mine if I manage to get more than one.
     
  9. Jon

    Jon Official Thread Killer Premium Member

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    I respectfully disagree. Turn based-combat, to me, houses far more strategy than the button mashing that it is now. To each his own, of course, but in the end turn-based ATB with every player housing a role that YOU control, each with specialties and moves that can trigger amazing combos? That's far better than whatever FF15 was. That was a travesty to the FF name. You had a tank that couldn't tank, DPS that couldn't DPS and a caster that couldn't cast because of a watered down magic system (in a game series based on that). Not to mention the PC had two moves, warp and swing-that-stick. It was grossly boring. Not controlling their actions hampered what you could logically have them do. And combos were based on chance as opposed to skill. Honestly, that's what I feel has happened, they've taken the skill out of the games.

    Anyway, on the graphic, I've nothing but agreement for you. The improved graphics are fun. But when everything else is lackluster at best, it's not enough for my liking.